food, Spain

Mallorquin food

Mallorca has lots of awesome food to offer. They love to cook with pork and lamb and, being an island, with tons of fresh fish and seefood. Mallorca seduced me to try ray for the first time but even though it was perfectly grilled, it was probably my last time.

all rights: http://www.honusports.com/mantaraynightdives.html

Since Spain and Mallorca have a bit off a touchy relationship, I’m not declaring that those things are typically Mallorquin or Spanish and you can find Spanish things in Mallorca and the other way round. For me, those are simply the things I have to eat while I’m on the island:

Ensaïmadas

Ensaïmadas are yeast-based dough circles, which you rip apart and dunk in hot chocolate. The hot chocolate is thick and has a slightly sour aftertaste – it’s a delicious combination.

pa amb oli

It’s a snack you can find everywhere on the island: a tomato-garlic sauce is spread on bread, which is then slathered with olive oil before more tomatoes, jamón Serrano and/or cheese are added.

gambas alioli

Shrimp, garlic cloves and sometimes chilipeppers are cooked in olive oil. It’s served with some sort of garlic mayonnaise and lots of white bread. You don’t have to eat the garlic cloves but where is the fun in that? This dish ensures you have your side of the beach all to yourself for about the next three days.

bon profit!

About enjirux

I'm a twenty-something female who moved from Austria to Scotland in 2009. Formally addicted to coffee, the UK has turned me into a bit of a tea snob and made me discover lots of wonderful things, e.g. pies. While I love to do a lot of things like writing, taking pictures, baking, traveling and spending days lazing about, my current pay checks says language teacher and will continue to say so until 2013 where there will be no pay check but dust and snakes as I'll venture into Asia. But that's still quite some time away and meanwhile I'll share my thoughts and worries and pictures of pies and short trips with you while gleefully butchering the English language.

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